Making the Best of Your Appointment

  • Prepare your thoughts and problems in advance by writing down your problem e.g: when your symptoms started, how they have changed.
  • Do a urine sample if you have pain passing urine or lower abdominal pain.
  • Do not try to add another person in on your consultation. The policy is one patient per appointment.  Please let reception know you need another appointment for this individual or prioritise who needs the appointment more.
  • Be honest with the doctor. It is important to tell the doctor the main reason you are there at the start of the consultation. If you are embarrassed, don’t be, the doctor is there to help and won’t be shocked.
  • If you have more than one problem you may need to book another appointment. Please let reception know and they will try and get you a longer appointment if possible. Otherwise, let your doctor know at the beginning of your consultation. They may be able to deal with more than one problem if they are related (up to a maximum of 2 problems). If you have multiple problems, the doctor may make you another appointment, especially if they are new or complex problems.
  • If you have any special needs please inform reception in advance so we can prepare the appointment for your first time (e.g. need an interpreter, visual impairment, hearing impairment, prefer male/female doctor etc..)
  • If you know you have difficulty understanding or explaining things, bring someone you trust with you or if you require an advocate, see the NHS choices advocacy services for further guidance.
  • Dress accordingly for possible examination. Loose clothing is best and remove any layers in advance.
  • Please let reception know if you would like a chaperone.

A consultation is about sharing in decisions about your care and goals. To make a good consultation you should let your doctor know about your goals, hopes, fears and expectations. This is why doctors ask you for YOUR thoughts. At the end of a consultation you should know:

  • What is your main problem.
  • What do you need to do about it.
  • What to do if it does not get any better.
Useful Links

NHS Choices – Get the most from a doctor’s appointment